Medical Affairs Focus

Thoughts on Global Medical Affairs

Monthly Archives: June 2015

Topic 38 – FDA Comments on Off-label Dissemination – Did it just tip its hand on upcoming off-label policy?

Have you had the opportunity to follow the Amarin lawsuit against the FDA?  If not, a quick recap:

 Amarin is literally a fish-oil salesman – they have fish-oil pills that are already FDA approved for the treatment of very high levels of triglycerides.  They had conducted clinical trials to expand their label to patients with lower levels of high triglycerides.  The FDA rejected their application.  Amarin decided it wanted to share the results of those studies anyway since they were positive and sued the FDA for the right to share its data on off-label use.

The interesting part comes from the FDA response letter.  Putting aside their primary concern that Amarin failed to work with them before suing them, the letter signed by Janet Woodcock went on to layout the condition in which Amarin (or for that matter any pharam company) can share off-label data.

First, the letter reiterated what we already know and have discussed: the reprint exemption to off label communication – distribute reprints from peer-reviewed journals, avoid some simple issues like highlighting only the “good” passages, and you are in the clear.

But then the letter goes on to say that Amarin can also write up and distribute its own summary of the results of their trial if the write up:

  • Remains factual and does not omit material information or introduce bias
  • Includes full data for each treatment group
  • States that the current label does not approve of the use
  • States that the impact on the off-label use has not been determined
  • Shares data about other, known similar studies that may have different results
  • Any financial or affiliation biases between the firm and the people who conducted the study

They go on to add that to protect against being misleading the company should:

  • Provide a copy of the current Package Insert
  • Provide a copy of any relevant reprints
  • Discuss these topics in an educational or scientific setting and not as a part of a promotional discussion or attached to promotional materials
  • Discussions should be conducted by persons with the appropriate background or training to accurately communicate scientific information

While that is still a lot of hurdles, that is a long way from reprints only.  And while these are NOT an official policy now, I think this is telegraphing what we should expect to see in the upcoming policies.

I particularly like the final bullet point which makes it clear that these topics need to be discussed by roles that sound very much like MSLs.

To speculate, if the FDA were to allow establish this as the policy, it would surely free up MA to proactively share both off label and label supportive information.  That would be a big improvement for some MA organizations that deny all proactive sharing of off-label information.

You can find the letter HERE.  The juicy bits begin on page 8.

What do you think?  Click here to leave a comment.

Advertisements

Topic 37: Medical Affairs and the Integrated Payer / Provider Model

For a while we have been discussing the need for a specialized medical affairs function focused on Payers – we discussed it here.

But what about Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) or other integrated payer / provider models, where the provider owns both the cost and the outcomes of their work. This type of model is becoming more and more prevalent, yet most MA organization have not flexed to directly engage with these types of organizations.

The needs for these organization are not a match for current MSL field organizations focused on HCPs and, while payer oriented organizations may be better suited, they are not a perfect match either.  Like payers, these groups are interested in population-level information. And, like payers, they care about total cost of care. But like HCPs they also place a greater emphasis on understanding treatments in the context of the overall disease progression and methodologies for approaches for ensuring improved outcomes with existing treatments.

I suggest that MA organizations are going to need to develop groups that directly target these ACOs. These will be teams that understand population health and quality metrics.And MA is going to need to collect this population data directly.  One thing that seems clear is that HEOR secondary endpoints gathered during P3 simply lack credibility with these audiences since they know the P3 had inclusion/exclusion criteria that did not model their patient population. Real world data and post marketing studies, already important for payers, is going to be equally important for these ACOs.

MA is going to need to come to them with models of costs and outcomes and budget impact, then partner with them to validate the model and gather relevant data about treatment approaches which produce the best results for the least costs.

What do you think? Leave a comment by clicking here.